nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

Great Grand Uncle Ed – silver miner

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My great-grandmother Ella’s brother was Edwin W. Hawk.  He was born in 1864, the sixth of eight children.

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‘Uncle Ed’ was an adventurer and went west when he was only 16, to live in southern Wyoming.  The US Census of 1880 lists Ed as a laborer at Crow Creek, Wyoming (not far from Laramie, Wyoming).  By 1886, my great-grandmother Ella was living in Laramie.  No doubt she had come west to live near her younger brother.

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By 1910, Ed was living in Humbolt, Nevada.  In 1920, he is listed as a lodger at Broadway Ave. in Lovelock, Nevada.  He is 56 years old, single, and a miner in a quartz mine.  Nevada is known as the ‘Silver State’ because of its silver mines.

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Ed continued to work as a miner.  At the time of his death in Lovelock in 1940, probate documents show he had a cabin in Vernon, Nevada  and six mining claims in the Seven Troughs Mining District.   He had an estate of $3200, a watch and chain, and $80 in cash.

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Vernon was established in 1905 as a base for those working in the Seven Troughs Mining District.  The landscape around Vernon is hilly, dominated by yellow sand, dotted with sagebrush.  The town dwindled in population as the silver depleted and was abandoned by 1918.  Today, it is a ghost town.

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Ed Hawk, Ella's brother

Ed Hawk, Ella’s brother

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I notice that the same photographer (J. Collier in Denver) took both Ed’s photo and a photo of my grandfather Leo as a baby (Ella’s son).  Ella lived in Denver until 1910 and perhaps Ed visited her there, and had his picture taken on a visit to see her baby.  For more information on Leo, see https://nichepoetryandprose.wordpress.com/2012/07/20/chicory-cichorium-intybus-l/

~

Leo Norman (son of Ella and Frank Norman)

Leo Norman as a baby (son of Ella and Frank Norman), my grandfather and Ed’s nephew

~

Copyright  2014   Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

August 1, 2014 at 7:15 am

family history – changes in 10 years

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As I look into my family history, I am often amazed by the changes that occur in families in short periods of time.  An example is found in the early life of my great-grandmother Ella – Mary Ellen (Hawk) Norman.  In the ten years from 1860 to 1870, she experienced dramatic changes in her family.

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The 1860 US Census shows Ella’s family living in Chestnut Hills Township, Monroe County, Pennsylvania.  The family included Josiah Hawk (Ella’s father, a shoemaker), Sallyann (Sarah Ann) (Ella’s mother), Owen and Ella (Ellen).  Mariah Hawk, Ella’s paternal grandmother was also living with them.

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Hawk 1860

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In the next decade, the family underwent remarkable change.  First, five children were born – Flora, Sarah, twins Edwin and Otto, and Emma.  Of these, Otto and Emma did not live (Josiah and Sallie had already lost a child in 1957).  Then Josiah died on June 28, 1865, a month and a half after Emma.  Also, sometime during the ten-year period, Maria Hawk, who lived until 1880, went to live elsewhere.

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John Franklin       born Sept. 15, 1855     (died Dec. 26, 1857, two years old)

Owen                       born April 21, 1857 (death date unknown)

Ellen                        born January 4, 1859   (Ella, my great-grandmother, died 1933)

Flora Alice              born June 25, 1860 (death date unknown)

Sarah Ann              born Dec. 11, 1863  (Sadie, my great grand-aunt, died 1921)

Edwin W.               born 1864 (Ed, my great grand-uncle, died 1940)

Otto                         born 1864 (death date unknown, before 1870)

Emma Lydia          born Jan. 7, 1865 (died May 9, 1865, 4 months old)

 

From: Atwood James Shupp, 1990, Genealogy of Conrad and Elizabeth (Borger) Hawk: 1744 – 1990, Gateway Press, Baltimore).

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In 1870, Ella’s mother, Sallie, married again to Joshua Popplewell.

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The 1870 US Census shows the results of all this change.  In 1870, the family is living in Williamsport, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania.  The family now includes Joshua Popplewell (step-father), Salie (Sara Ann) (mother), Owen, Mary (Ella), Flora, Edwin and Sarah (Sadie).

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Hawk 1870

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The person most affected by these changes must have been my great-great-grandmother, Sara Ann (Sallie).  During the decade she gives birth to five children (including a set of twins), her husband dies, she remarries, and she changes the location of her home at least once.  In the only photo I have of her, she seems a formidable woman, steeled to withstand all manner of disruption in her life.  I also see great sadness in her eyes.

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my great-great-grandmother Sallie -  Sarah Anne (Kresge) Hawk Popplewell (1835 - 1910)

my great-great-grandmother Sallie – Sarah Anne (Kresge) Hawk Popplewell (1835 – 1910)

 

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Our lives are dynamic, full of change.  New people enter our lives, others leave.  The place we call home shifts to a new location.  We go to school and graduate, we take a new job, we retire.  Our focus changes, along with our point of view.  Some change is dramatic, some subtle.  Some change makes us laugh, some makes us cry.

~

What changes do you see in the decades of your life?

~

Copyright  2014  Jane Tims

 

Written by jane tims

July 30, 2014 at 7:33 am

learning to spin

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All spring and summer, I have been dyeing wool roving with dyestuff collected from the roadside and garden.  I have always intended to use this wool in some of my weaving projects, but lately, I have decided to first spin the wool roving into yarn.  Everyone recommends learning first to spin with a drop spindle, later graduating to a spinning wheel.

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First, I went online to learn the basics and decide which drop spindle I should use.  Then I ordered my maple bottom whorl drop spindle on eBay for $7.95 ( $15.60, including shipping).

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drop spindle

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To spin, I first attach an end of the roving to the hook on the end of the spindle.  The method is to tease out a sparse bundle of fibres and spin the spindle, twisting the section of wool into a thread.  I spin the spindle counterclockwise, pinching the wool as I tease it out, holding the spindle still on my lap when I have to use both hands.  Eventually, I will get better and be able to hold the spindle in the air with one hand and spin the spindle with the other.  I do this a bit now, but I am plagued by breaking wool.  For an enjoyable beginner’s lesson in spinning, see Jennifer Beamer’s video at  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FtBLIg4JhNI .

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Spinning with a drop spindle is addictive!  I now spin the roving as soon as it is dry after dyeing.  My yarn is still very knobbly – a little like the yarn you use to knit those bulky sweaters!  My balls of yarn are getting better all the time, although I have trouble getting too much spin into the yarn, so it twists up on itself quite easily!

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070_crop

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So far I have eleven balls of wool: Tansy, Old-Man’s-Beard, Bugleweed, Alder bark, Lily of the Valley (2 balls), Beet roots, Beet leaves, Carrot leaves, Radish leaves, and Comfrey.

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plant-dyed wool, spun using a drop spindle

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This is so much fun!

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Comfrey-dyed spun wool

~

Copyright  2014  Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

July 28, 2014 at 7:55 am

Great Grand Aunt Sadie – dressmaker

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As I learn about my family history, I am drawn to the stories of the individuals I encounter.  One of the people important in my great-grandmother Ella’s life was her sister Sadie.  Sadie was born on December 11, 1863 in Pennsylvania, the fifth child of eight children.  She was called after her mother, Sarah Ann (Kresge).  Sadie’s father was Josiah Hawk, a shoemaker who died when Sadie was a little over a year old and Ella was six.  For a little more about Josiah, see  https://nichepoetryandprose.wordpress.com/2012/10/17/occupation-shoemaker/

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As far as I know, Sadie remained unmarried throughout her life.  This meant that she had to support herself. Few opportunities were available to women in the late 1800s, but Sadie stayed connected to her family and earned her way as a seamstress. The 1910 US Census shows Sadie as a dressmaker living with her mother, a landlady.

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Sadie Hawk (1863-1921)

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By looking at the US Census for 1870, 1900, 1910, and 1920, as well as the City Directories for Scranton, I can account for Sadie most years.

In the 1870 census, when she was six and a half, she lived with her mother in Williamsport, Pennsylvania.  That year, her mother married Joshua Popplewell, a machinist living in Scranton.

I have not located Sadie in the 1880 Census due to the commonness of her name.

From 1888 until her death in 1921, Sadie lived in Scranton.  Her addresses included 330 Lackawanna Avenue (1896 – 1900), 16-18 Williams Building (1905 and 1906), 101 Spruce Street (1907 to 1916), and 116 Mulberry Street (1917 to 1921).  I have looked at these addresses on Street View (Google Earth) and the houses where Sadie lived are all gone, replaced by parking lots and modern businesses.

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Sadie made her home with her mother Sallie Popplewell from 1907 until Sallie’s death in 1910 or 1911, and with sister Ella, my great-grandmother, from 1910 to 1921.

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Sadie Hawk

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Sadie died at 2 PM on March 26, 1921.  In her will, Sadie described Ella (my great-grandmother) as her “beloved sister”.

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When I was a teenager, my Aunt Jane told me about Sadie and gave me Sadie’s locket.

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Aunt Sadie's locket (front)

Aunt Sadie’s locket (front)

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Her initials are beautifully engraved on the back – S A H –  Sarah Ann Hawk …  the sweet-faced woman in the photos above.

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Aunt Sadie's locket (back)

~

Copyright  2014   Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

July 25, 2014 at 6:54 am

Arthur – after the storm

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Over a week after Tropical Storm Arthur, I am thinking about the new pattern of life we adopted during our six days without electricity.  Without our usual electric lights, stove, refrigerator, computer and television, we adjusted our days.

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First there were candles.  I have lots of candles, but three pillars in the living room sent enough light into the main part of the house for navigation.   We also had our small flashlights.  They lit the darker rooms and made us safe on the stairs.

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The next ‘necessity’ was gasoline for the truck and for our small generator (2000 watt).  Although we began the storm with very little gasoline (we were not well prepared), we waited a couple of days to fill up, to avoid the long lineups for gas at the few stations open after the storm.  Since most all of Fredericton was without power for the first two days, so open gas stations, fast food places and grocery stores were hard to find!

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Once we had our generator working, we had a hot meal at supper time each evening, on our small electric hotplate.  By the end of the six days, we were using our generator for fans to keep the house cool and to watch DVDs on our television.

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Water, of course, is always a concern.  We had lots of water on hand, about 22 4-liter jugs I keep for emergencies.  We were able to buy drinking water and ice for our cooler, although these items were flying from the shelves!!!  By the end of our adventure, we had filled our jugs a couple of times, once at my son’s home (in the city, they had no power, but they did have water), and once from the Oromocto Fire Department who were so kind to us.

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On Day 6, workers from NB Power and Hydro-Quebec, and a tree trimming crew from Maine arrived to remove the trees from the downed lines on our road.  They worked all day to re-establish power to about 500 customers who depended on this particular line.  We were so grateful to them, knowing they had worked since the storm hit.  We were just one group among many waiting for power.  On Sunday, July 13, there were still 5000 customers without power in Fredericton.  By the time of this post, NB Power says most power will be restored.  It is certainly the longest power outage we have ever experienced in this province.

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three candles

three candles

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three candles

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between ruby glass

and hard wood floor

a slide of light and three

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extinguished candles

smoke lifts from smoulder

each mote a particle

~

of spectral light, mosaic

shard, image

reassembled in three

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dimensions

shepherd, hawthorn

lamb

~

 

©  Jane Tims 2011

Written by jane tims

July 16, 2014 at 7:14 am

Arthur – during the storm

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front yard during Arthur

front yard during Arthur

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trees in hurricane rain

trees in hurricane rain

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Arthur

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woods are a green ocean

swell, each oak a breaker, and pines

crash on the shore, withdraw, branches

lift and fall, lift and settle

maples gyrate, invert their leaves, backlit

waves, spray from every

blade, winds tug at petiole, green

debris on the deck, fallen stars

on the lawn, the wind a rumble, every

branch a knife, each trunk a bow, bent

beyond the stretch of fibre, trees heave

branches lash, in the woods a crack

pummels the growl of a chainsaw in

the neighbor’s yard

~

~

bunches of leaves on the deck

bunches of leaves on the deck

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a crack in the branch of our maple

a crack in the branch of our maple

~

Copyright  2014  Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

July 14, 2014 at 7:00 am

abandoned railroad siding

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Viceroy on rail

Viceroy on rail

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abandoned railroad siding

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a  viceroy butterfly, orange

leaded glass

and rows of wary eyes

naturally suspicious

settles on the slate-grey rail

flexes its wings, nonchalant

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as the black bear who

ambled the track

left a dump

of blackberry seed

undigested pulp

or the enthusiastic jumble of clovers

blooming between the ties

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rails are held between the trill

of insect and the quaver

of goldenrod, caught in the crossfire of sun

light focused through

signal lenses

and glass insulators

on unstrung

telephone poles

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turn toward horizon

rails merge and vanish

altered stride of railroad

walking made confident

by the absence of train

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~

railway crossing

railway crossing

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railway near Rooth, New Brunswick

railway near Rooth, New Brunswick

~

Copyright  2014  Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

July 4, 2014 at 7:42 am

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